Potato Variety Kerr’s Pinks: origin and characteristics

Kerr’s Pink are the second most popular potato in Ireland. They are mainly cooked as boiled potatoes but are good for roasting and chipping also. They are suitable for pre-packing and general ware.

Origin

Although thought to be an Irish bred potato when it was introduced in 1917- it was actually J. Henry of Cornhill in Scotland who created the variety in 1907.

Yield and dry matter

Medium yields of 10 tons per acre and a medium dry matter potato.

Culinary aspects

Traditionally Kerr’s Pinks are boiled with their skins on and they are excellent prepared this way. They have a fine-grained fluffy, floury texture. They are very good for making mash, roasted and will even make good chips.

Potato characteristics

Round or short oval uneven shaped potatoes with light pink skin and deeper pink colour at the eyes. They have many eyes which are medium deep-set, with smooth skin and a cream colour flesh.

Plant characteristics

Kerr’s pinks have a very tall plant that blooms in a white flower. They are a maincrop potato and are absent from potato berries. They have late foliage maturity.

Resistance to diseases

Medium resistance to Late Blight (on tubers and plant), Potato Virus, Potato Leafroll Virus, Potato Dry Rot and Common Scab. Kerrs Pinks have low resistance to Skin spot.

Resistance to pests

Low resistance to Potato Cyst Nematode (Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis)

Resistance to damage

Medium resistance to damage. High resistance to splitting

Storage

Kerr’s Pink low water content ensures they can store well for a long time.

Summary

Kerr’s Pink are a very tasty potato but have quite low yields and is not a very uniform size. Deeper set eyes and quite smallish potatoes make peeling before cooking less favourable, care to avoid overboiling is essential as you can end up with a pot of mush quickly. Despite much lower yields and profitability to growers the high demand from consumers ensure this excellent eating and tasting potato shows no sign of stopping anytime soon.

Further reading;

https://www.gardenfocused.co.uk/vegetable/potatoes/variety-kerrs-pink.php